9 political cartoons by Dr. Seuss that are still relevant today.

9 political cartoons by The legendary children’s author Dr. Seuss had some thoughts that are still relevant today about ‘America First.’

1Did you will know in addition to being a beloved author of children’s books, Dr. Seuss wrote in excess of 400 political cartoons during World War II?

Theodor Seuss Geisel, higher quality as Dr. Seuss, gifted the planet with stories like “The Cat inside Hat,” “The Lorax,” “Green Eggs and Ham,” and a large number of other childhood classics until his death in 1991.

In the past several years, however, it’s several of his lesser known works from your 1940s that contain gained attention.

Seuss reads from “Horton Hears a Who!” to 4-year-old Lucinda Bell in 1956. Photo via AP.

In the time leading up to World War II, Seuss began penning cartoons for PM, a liberal publication, frequently pushing back from the “America First” mentality of U.S. isolationists averse to U.S. involvement inside the war.

So when candidate Donald Trump adopted “Make America Great Again” as his campaign slogan, echoing cries of “America First” — the rallying involve an anti-Semitic and Nazi-appeasing segment in the wartime U.S. population — many of Seuss’ cartoons started to find new relevance a lot more than 70 years after first being published.

Like that one, which depicts a mom reading a novel titled “Adolf the Wolf” to children while wearing an “America First” shirt, explaining that as the wolf’s victims were foreign children, it did not really matter the wolf ate them — a definite parallel towards the conflicting solutions to our modern refugee crisis.

“And the Wolf chewed inside the children and spit out their bones … but those were Foreign Children and it also really didn’t matter.” Image dated Oct. 1, 1941, via Dr. Seuss Political Cartoons/Special Collection and Archives, UC San Diego Library.

Image dated Oct. 9, 1941, via Dr. Seuss Political Cartoons/Special Collection and Archives, UC San Diego Library.

“We Clams Can’t Be Too Careful.” Image dated July 17, 1941, via Dr. Seuss Political Cartoons/Special Collection and Archives, UC San Diego Library.

“The old Family tub is plenty safe in my opinion!” Image dated May 27, 1941, via Dr. Seuss Political Cartoons/Special Collection and Archives, UC San Diego Library.

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